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Scripts Adopted by Türkic Peoples

Introduction

During the millenniums of their history on the expanses of Eurasia, the Türkic-speaking people used their own and adopted systems of writing. It is preposterous to suggest that a Eurasian family of peoples comprising now 85+ nations that populate Eurasia from one end to the other was illiterate. Throughout their known history, Türkic people bordered on literate people, ruled over literate people, had literate people in their midst, lived amidst literate people, and could not have escaped literacy even if they tried to very hard. The notion that the greatest empires of their days, the Eastern and the Western Hunnic Empire, and their descendents, could exist without literate administrative apparatus is derisory. The most widespread, during the last seven centuries of the present era, was the use of the Arabic alphabet, adopted with the spread of Islam among Türks. In the last century the Arabic alphabet was mostly replaced by the Latin-derived alphabets, and now the Arabic alphabet is used by the Türks only in the countries where it is a national script: Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Pakistan, Syria. In the countries controlled by the USSR, a whirlwind, designed to break the spine of intellectuality, first forbade the Arabic script and its writings, replacing it with a Latin, and soon the Latin script was rabidly replaced by a variety of custom-deformed Cyrillic-derived mutually almost incomprehensible scripts for each administrative division of the subdivided country. In the territory controlled by the PRC, the Latin script was introduced for two decades, and then Arabic script was re-institutionalized.

The following collection illustrates the scripts in use prior to the adoption of the Arabic script as a "lingua franca" between the Türkic people. It should be earnestly stressed that the dating of the most artifacts is purely conjectural, reflecting perfectly the perceptions of the reporters but not the facts. In those cases when the artifacts are not self-dating, the real scientific dating analysis is still pending.  The collection is a little sampling, it is far from being even a simple systematic collection.

Scripts
 

Türkic Script

 
Title Period Spread Type To see it
Issyk 500 BC Kazakhstan Oldest inscription in Türkic alphabet

. manjolov
Proto-Türkic rune-like inscription on silver cup

Summary Anthology

Horezm 200 BC Horezm, Sogd Turanian Writing

Azgar Mukhamadiev
Turanian Writing

Aramaic 100 AD Parthian Middle Eastern Aramaic

Diker S.
And The Whole Earth Was Of One Language

Türkic 300 - 800AD S. Caucasus: Azerbaijan and Iran Azerbaijan and Iran

Dr. Farid Alakbarov
Early Alphabets in Azerbaijan

Hunnic 300 - 1000 AD E. Europe Turanian Writing

Azgar Mukhamadiev
Diggizikh Dish

Euro Asiatic Isfar 500 - 700 AD Fergana Writings Of Eurasian Steppes

Kyzlasov I.L
Paleography of 8 Türkic Alphabets

Orkhon 500 - 900 AD E. Central Asia Classical and widely known  
Euro Asiatic Achiktash 600 - 700 AD Jety-Su Writings Of Eurasian Steppes

Kyzlasov I.L
Paleography of 8 Türkic Alphabets

Euro Asiatic S. Enisei (Orkhon) 700 - 900 AD E. Central Asia Writings Of Eurasian Steppes

Kyzlasov I.L
Paleography of 8 Türkic Alphabets 

Euro Asiatic Kuban 800 - 1200 AD Kuban, Don Writings Of Eurasian Steppes

Kyzlasov I.L
Paleography of 8 Türkic Alphabets

Hungarian 500 AD - Present Central Europe Sekler Rovash script  - Khazar script

Gabor Hosszu
Relation of Rovas Scripts to Eurasian Writing Systems

Asiatic        
Enisei        
Talas        
         
 

Glagolic Script

Glagolic        
         
 

Cyrillic Script

Cyrillic 800 - 1000 AD Danube Bolgaria

Bulgarian Inscriptions

Peter Dobrev
http://members.tripod.com/~Groznijat/pb_lang/suppl2.html

         
 
 

Greek Script

Greek ca 470 BC Scythians Atails coin (Gr. Ateas)

G.Dremin
Scythian lexicon

Greek ca 800 (Guestimate) Danube Bulgaria Inventory record

Mudrak O.A.
Notes on language and culture of Danube Bulgars

Greek 1000 AD

Caucasus

Tombstone Inscription (widely publicized high class Russian fake)

Zgusta L.
Old Ossetic Inscription from the River Zelenchuk (bi-lingual)

Kudaev M.
Zelenchuk Inscription Malkar (Balkar) Reading (in Balkar)
Zelenchuk Inscription Malkar (Balkar) Reading (in English)
Zelenchuk Inscription Malkar (Balkar) Reading (in Russian)

Abaev V.I.
Zelenchuk Inscription (bi-lingual)

Vagapov Ya.S.
Zelenchuk Inscription Vainakh Reading (L.Zgusta p. 42 on) (bi-lingual)

Kafoev A.Z.
Zelenchuk Inscription Adyg Reading (L.Zgusta p. 46 on) (bi-lingual)

 

Syriac Script

Syriac 1200 - 1350 AD

C. Asia
Huanghe

Syriac Writings and Turkic Language according to Central Asian Tombstone Inscriptions

Wassilios Klein
http://syrcom.cua.edu/Hugoye/Vol5No2/HV5N2Klein.html

         
 
 
Home
Back
In Russian
Hunnic Writing
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Sources
Roots
Tamgas
Alphabet
Writing
Language
Genetics
Geography
Archeology
Religion
Coins
Wikipedia
Paleography of 8 Türkic Alphabets
Türkic and Kharosthi Table
Besenyos, Ogur and Oguz
Karosthi
(Kharosthi) Script
Karosthi-Aramaic Script
Alan Dateline
Avar Dateline
Besenyo Dateline
Bulgar Dateline
Huns Dateline
Karluk Dateline
Khazar Dateline
Kimak Dateline
Kipchak Dateline
Kyrgyz Dateline
Sabir Dateline
Seyanto Dateline
08/21/2005
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