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O.Suleymenov
Az i A (Az and I)
Alma-Ata, 1975
Berendeys

Foreword

In the following citation, O.Suleymenov suggests an alternate origin for the Slavicized name "Berendey". A simpler and more suitable etymology would be "Baryndy", i.e. akin to "Barynians", literally "belonging to Baryn (clan, tribe)". The melding of the Kyiv Rus' Slavic populace with the people of the Suvarian clan Baryn, called "Berendeys" in the oldest literary monuments of the Kyiv Rus, provides an explanation for the palatalized Türkic dialect preserved both in the Türkified Slavic of the modern Ukrainian and Russian, and in the Türkified Mari of the modern Chuvash. The unequivocally Türkic Berendeys occupied exceptionally prominent role in the "Song of Igors Campaign", "Primary Chronicle", and in the life of the pre-Mongolian Kyiv Rus, as narrated in the following citation from O.Suleymenov Az i A (Az and I), Alma-Ata, 1975 (Russ). Part 1 Song of Igors Campaign, Chapter Berendeys. That the Suvars occupied the territory of the present Chernigov Province in the Ukraine, called Karadjar in Bulgarian, where "Kara" was translated to Slavic as "Chern", i.e "Black", and "djar" was translated to Slavic as "glav" > now "gov", i.e. "head", we know from the Ptolemaic times.

For details on Suvar's history, click here Sabir Dateline.

The name of the clan Baryn means "military glory, victory", it is associated with a legendary Alp Baryn, depicted as a gorgeous gray wolf. For medieval legend about Alp Baryn refer to Shan Kyzy Dastany by Mikail Bashtu Ibn Shams Tebir (Mikail Bashtu). Baryn was one of five Sabanian clan divisions: Baryn, Tuk-Suba, Aksuba, Djulut and Bakhta. Clan Baryn played a major role in the pre-Slavic history of the Ukraine, its Slavic history, and the Bulgaria. During the time of Sulabi's son Avar, who in the 727 AD came to power in the Kara-Bulgar (Western half of the Ukraine, here "kara" means "western"), the Anchis, aka Antes, became a vital force of the Bulgarian power. The Anchis of the Western  Ukraine were a mix of the Slavs with the descendents of the clans Erdim, Seber, Bakil, Agathir, and Baryn, who later headed up the Anchian clans, and who belonged to the Urus and Bulgar superclans, and also with some people from other clans. Another part of the Baryns remained semi-autonomous subjects of the Kara Bulgars. In Bulgaria, in 882 Khan Alabuga of the Baryn line of Sabans founded a city which later turned into Bilyar and became known as one of the capitals of the Bulgarian Khanate. The majority language of the Kara-Bulgar was the Sabanian (Suvarian) dialect of the Bulgarian.

Both Russian historiography and journalism presented and still present hypotheses of Slavic origin of the Berendeys, they are remarkable in avoiding citations of exclusively Turkic names and traditions. O.Suleimenov in his time made one tiny, but a courageous step in a right direction.

O.Suleymenov
Berendeys

Like the Torkins, other Türkic clans went to the service of Rus knyazes, not necessarily connected by princely marriage. Frequently they were small nomadic clans offended by Badjinaks (Besenyos), and later by Kipchak Kumans, who could not compete in the steppe, and became federates of their stronger northern neighbors. Those nomads who betrayed, sold to Rus, were probably called by Badjinaks and Kumans "Beryudi", i.e. swappers, sold out. In Rus annals they are called Berendeys. (Beryudi assimilated to Berendy, the "i" in Rus pronunciation is "ee" and it coincided with Slavic plural ending. In such cases in singular arose reflex "y", like in derivations  "zodchi - zodchiy (architect), kaznachi - kaznachey (treasurer). This is the origin of ending "y"  in the endings of Polish surnames: Uspenski - Uspenskiy and so on.) Berendeys stood out from common mercenaries by their cruelty in relation to their steppe tribesmen.

In the 1155 Berendeys in service of Yury Dolgoruky captured many Kumans. The scapees fled to the steppe for help, came back to Kiev, and appealed to Yury that he ordered his mercenaries to return the captives. Dolgoruky only raised his hands, for the Berendeys rejected: "With your son we die for Rus land, and give our heads for your honor". They defended the right of federates to the military booty, and the right of exiles for revenge.

Berendeys, like the majority of Torkins, lived permanently in the Rus, "by their clan lineage". For their service they want not the money like Vikings demanded from Novgorodians, but residence cities (benefices).

In the 1159 the Berendeys leaders Dudar Satmaz'ovich, Karakoz Miüz'ovich and Koraz Kokey figured for themselves to benefit from switching from prince Izyaslav to Mstislav. They sent envoys to Mstislav with a message: "If you want to love us as we were loved by your father, and give each one of us a better (finer) city, with that we shall withdraw from Izyaslav".

Mstislav agreed, and divvied up cities for them.

Not all Rus cities where Berendeys lived preserved in their names a memory of them. For example, in the Jitomir Province in the Ukraine is a well known city of Berdichev (in the 18th century it still was Berendichev).

 
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TurkicWorld
9/14/2005
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