Home
Contents Türkic languages

Datelines
Sources
Roots
Tamgas
Alphabet
Writing
Language
Genetics
Geography
Archeology
Religion
Coins

Datelines
Classification of Türkic languages
Language Types
Lingo-Ethnical Tree
IE, Arians, Dravidian, and Rigveda
Scythian Ethnic Affiliation
Ogur and Oguz
Türkic and European in Neo- & Mesolith
Türkic in Romance
Türkic in Greek
Türkic-Etruscan
V.I.Abaev: girdle of Scytho-Iranian theory
Alan Dateline
Avar Dateline
Besenyo Dateline
Bulgar Dateline
Huns Dateline
Karluk Dateline
Khazar Dateline
Kimak Dateline
Kipchak Dateline
Kyrgyz Dateline
Sabir Dateline
Seyanto Dateline

Classification of Türkic languages

Links - —сылки

 

Preface

Etymological tracing of the languages strongly differs from the studies of the modern linguistic picture. The modern picture reflects the state of scholarship in the field, a fairly static picture with some prominent lacunas. Etymology looks at process, trying to reach to the bottom. Not to the center of the Earth, with its glob of undifferentiated magma, but to the rain clouds in the sky that spew the water flows, each river with its own personality, watershed area, and tributary system. Climbing up the river allows to reach confluence points from where comes an amalgamated flow. A complex analysis of stream components and their topology, with some concept of the watershed properties, leads to gradual discernment of the processes and components involved.

It must be given that all languages are a result of amalgamation, there is no self-contained language on this Earth with a theoretical exception of some island locations completely isolated from the rest of the humanity. The amalgamation is corroborated by the Y-DNA composites describing any modern monolingual ethnicity or nation-state. This indisputable fact invalidates any mythological Уproto-languageФ constructs of the УPIEФ or Biblical type. Rather, a diverse myriad of tiny linguistic communities kept amalgamating with time into ever growing and shrinking societies till they reached a pinnacle of multi-lingual nation-states.

Latter-Days English Linguistic Timeline
If human languages appeared 30,000 years ago,
English people first were speaking in foreign tongues for 29,000 years
before English was pieced together
http://www.danshort.com/ie/grafx/timeline.gif

 

As of today (2018), even the very number of the Türkic languages is not established. Different sources cite figures 40+, 42, 45, and the like. Nor there is a single phonemic system for either old nor modern Turkic languages. That illustrates not only the European political and scholar aversion to the supercharged subject, but also the complexity of the subject, faulty premises, the blurriness of the spotty definitions, the ingrained biases, the randomness of the undertaken studies, and a train of direct and indirect obstacles. The following listing is cited from the Sevortyan E.V., 1974, Etymological Dictionary of Türkic languages (Common Türkic and inter-Türkic vowel stems), Science, Moscow. 1974, pp. 8-9. The listing for the abbreviations used in the volume 1 is incomplete, it is being complemented by amendments in the next 6 volumes, but it gives some initial idea on the complexity of the object. For example, it includes Halaj but excludes the ancestor Alat and other daughter Alats. The listing is also somewhat redundant, it randomly includes over again linguistic time slices of the same languages. The complexity of the object is no wonder, the Celts carried some bits of the lexicon around Mediterranean in the 4th mill. BC, like the word cairn, which ascends to the first appearance of the cairn burials in the Eastern Europe at the dawn of the Kurgan culture, 6th-7th mill. BC. The time depth, mobility, and events certainly complicated the object.

Numerous other Türkic languages with documented or recoverable lexical elements and identified ethnicities were neither perused nor included in the listing: Abdaly/Ephthalite, Alan/As/Yazır/Masgut, Avar/Avshar, Bayad, Bayundur, Beğdilli, Büğdüz, Chepni, Chunkar, Bosnyak/Pecheneg, Dodurga, Düger/Digor/Tuhsi/Tokhar/Tochar, Ekrad, Eymür, İğdir, Karkın, Kimak, Hunnic, Kayi, Kangar, Sabir, Salur, Scythian, Uisyn/Usuns, Varsak, Yaparlı, Yıva, Yörük, Yüreğir, and probably some more.

Where readily available, the listing adds the phylum of the ancestor language, i.e. Lobnor Uigur Karluk-Horezm is the УLobnorФ language of the Uigur branch of the Karluk branch also called Horezm branch. There is plenty of confusion with the naming, mostly associated with the location where an expedition run their studies. This is a confusing and sad practice, in conflict with the accepted scientific norms that anchor the name to the autonym of the ethnicity. Literal translations, like an alien Lebedin (Ћебединский, Russian for Уswan'sФ) instead of the native Kuu (swan) further obfuscate the subject. In most cases, such homemade confusion is not warranted at all. Historically, the tribal alliances went by the name of the leading ethnos (super-ethnos), and that name (i.e. Oguz, Türk, Kangar, Tele etc.) covered all subethnoses, and that defined the names of the constituent languages including the lingua franca (usually, a Sprachbund). Some languages, like the Altaians, coalesced from a diverse collection of immigrant languages. In a couple of the last centuries, they formed their own informal Sprachbunds finally formalized by the new Soviet power into a new Altaian Esperantos administratively imposed on the entire still diverse populace, at the expense of the local vernaculars. The cultural slaughter in the Altai was criminal, children were forbidden to use their mother tongue.

The subject of the 8-volume etymological compendium was to trace development from the base roots to the formed Türkic languages. To review the etymology of the 84 listed Türkic languages, the scientific team had to turn to the whooping 193 languages, from Avesta to Japanese. That demonstrates the extent of amalgamation, the reach of the words across linguistic families, and the Türkic contribution to the Eurasian languages.

The complete original listing in Russian is shown following the translated citation in English.

TÜRKIC LANGUAGES
1 Aksu Uigur
2 Altai
3 Azeri
4 Balkar
5 Baraba
6 Bashkir
7 Bosnian
8 Bukhara
9 Bulgarian
10 Chagatai Karluk
11 Chulym (Lower Chulym)
12 Chulym Middle Age
13 Chuvash
14 Crimean Tatar
15 Danube-Bulgarian
16 Eushta (Yaushta, Gayshta, Hayshta, Tomsk Turks, Hanty, Kipchaks)
17 Gagauz
18 Halaj (Alat)
19 Hittite
20 Hotan Uygur
21 Kaczyn Khakass
22 Karachay
23 Karachay-Balkar
24 Karaim
25 Karaite Crimean
26 Karaite Galician
27 Karakalpak
28 Karakirgiz
29 Kazakh
30 Kazan Tatar
31 Kek-Moncha
32 Keri Khotan Uigur
33 Khakass
34 Khazar (Qazar, Chulym)
35 Khorasan Turkic
36 Khorezm
37 Koibal Khakass
38 Kokand Uzbek
39 Kondak
40 Kondom Shor Khakas
41 Kucha Uygur
42 Kuer (Küerik, Kuarik) Khazar (Chulym)
43 Kuman
44 Kumandin Altai
45 Kumyk
46 Kurdak Turkic
47 Kuu (Chelkandy, Lebedinsky) Tuvinian
48 Kypchak
49 Kyrgyz
50 Kyzyl Khakass
51 Lobnor Uigur Karluk-Khorezm
52 Mishar Tatar
53 Nogai
54 Ottoman
55 Sagai Khakass
56 Sakha (Yakut)
57 Salar
58 Salbin
59 Saryg-Yugur
60 Seljuk
61 Shor
62 Simbirsk Mishar
63 Soyon Tuvinian
64 Soyot Tuvinian
65 Taranchi (Kuldjin, Tarim) Uigur
66 Tatar
67 Telengit Tele
68 Teleut Tele
69 Tobol Kypchak
70 Todji (Todzhi) Tuvinian
71 Tofalar  Tuvinian
72 Trakai Karaite
73 Turfan Uygur
74 Turkic Middle Age ("Divan"  Mahmud Kashgari)
75 Turkic Old (Middle Age)
76 Turkish
77 Turkmen
78 Tuva (Tuvinian)
79 Tyumen Tatar
80 Uigur
81 Uygur Old (Middle Age)
82 Uzbek
83 Uzbek Middle Age
84 Yenisei-Orkhon
Complete listing of the Russian original (193 entries)

8

ј
авест.  Ч  авестийский
аз. Ч азербайджанский
аксуйск. Ч аксуйский (говор центрального диалекта уйгурского €зыка)
алт. Ч алтайский
ар. Ч арабский
арм. Ч арм€нский
арх. Ч архаический
Ѕ
бал. Ч балкарский
бар. Ч €зык барабинских татар
баш. Ч башкирский
болг. Ч болгарский
босн. Ч боснийскотурецкий (диалект)4
булг. Ч булгарский
бур€т. Ч бур€тский (Mongolic)
бух. Ч бухарский (диалект узбекского €зыка)
¬
венг. Ч венгерский
вог. Ч вогульский (мансийский)
вот. Ч вот€кский (удмуртский)

г. Ч галицкий (диалект караимского €зыка)
гаг. Ч гагаузский
гольд. Ч гольдский (нанайский)
греч. Ч греческий
ƒ
др.-евр. Ч древнееврейский
др.-инд. Ч древнеиндийский
др.-перс. Ч древнеперсидский
др.-русск. Ч древнерусский
др.-тюрк. Ч древнетюркский
др.-уйг. Ч древнеуйгурский
дун.-булг. Ч дунайско-булгарский

ен.-орх. Ч енисейско-орхонский
енис.-самоед. Ч енисейско-самоедский (энецкий)
«
зап.-тюрк. Ч западнотюркское, западнотюркские (€зыки, диалекты, говоры)
»
и.-е. Ч индоевропейский
инд. Ч индийский
иран. Ч иранский, иранские
ист. Ч исторический, относ€щийс€ к устаревшим формам €зыка
 
к. Ч крымский (диалект караимского €зыка)
каз. Ч казахский
казан. Ч казанскотатарский
калм. Ч калмыцкий
камас. Ч камасинский (койбалы (хойбал), Uralic-Nenets)
кар. Чкараимский
караг. ٠ карагасский (Uralic-Nenets)
карач. Ч карачаевский
кач. Ч качинский (диалект хакасского €зыка)
кбал. Ч карачаево-балкарский
кер. Ч  керийский (говор хотанского диалекта уйгурского €зыка)
кЄк-м Ч кЄк-мончакский (тюркский €зык, близкородственный сойотскому, тувинскому, тофаларскому и кЄк-мончакскому))
кир Ч  киргизский
кит. Ч  китайский2
ккал. Ч  каракалпакский
ккир. Ч  каракиргизский
койб. Ч  койбальский (диалект хакасского €зыка)
коканд. Ч  кокандский (диалект узбекского €зыка)
коми-зыр. Ч  коми-зыр€нский2
конд., кондом. Ч  кондомский (= шорский) Khakas Ч по ¬ербицкому
кондак., конд. гов.  Ч  кондаковский говор (конд. гов. по  астрену)
кор. Ч  корейский2
ктат. Ч  крымскотатарский
кум. Ч кумыкский
куман. Ч  куманский
куманд. Ч  кумандинский (диалект алтайского €зыка)
кур. Ч  курдакскотюркский
куч. Ч  кучарский (говор центрального диалекта уйгурского €зыка)
кыз. Ч  кызыльский (диалект хакасского €зыка)
кыпч. Ч кыпчакский, кыпчакские
кюэр. Ч  кюэрикский (диалект €зыка чулымских тюрков)
Ћ
лам. Ч  ламутский (эвенский)
лапп. Ч  лаппский (саамский)
лат. Ч  латинский
леб. Ч  лебединский (диалект алтайского €зыка)
лоб. Ч  лобнорский (карлукско-хорезмийска€ группа - уйгурский €зык)
ћ
манд. Ч  мандаринский (о  итайском €зыке)
маньчж. Ч  маньчжурский
мар. Ч  марийский
миш., мишар Ч  мишарский (диалект татарского €зыка)
монг. Ч - монгольский
монгор. Ч  монгорский

Ќ
нанай. Ч  нанайский
негид. Ч  негидальский (Tungusic)
нижн.-чул. Ч  нижнечулымский (диалект)
нов.-перс. Ч  новоперсидский
ног. Ч  ногайский
ќ
орд. Ч  ордосский (Mongolian)
орок. Ч  орокский (тунгусо-маньчжурский)2 (”ильтинский €зык именуетс€ как уйльтинским, так и уйльтским, уйльта, ультинским, ультским, ульта, и, конечно, орокским (ибо русские с давних времен называют уйльта ороками). Ќазывают его и ороченским.)
ороч. Ч  ороченский (тунгусо-маньчжурский)2 (”ильтинский €зык именуетс€ как уйльтинским, так и уйльтским, уйльта, ультинским, ультским, ульта, и, конечно, орокским (ибо русские с давних времен называют уйльта ороками). Ќазывают его и ороченским.)
орх.-ен. Ч  см. ен.-орх.
8
осет. Ч осетинский
осм. Ч османский
ост€к. Ч  ост€кский (хантыйский)
ѕ
перс. Ч  персидский
пехлев. Ч  пехлевийский2 (мЄртвый среднеперсидский €зык самоназвание: парсик "Persian")
прамонг. Ч прамонгольский

рум. Ч румынский
русск. Ч  русский

саам Ч  саамский
саг. Ч  сагайский (диалект хакасского €зыка “аrama Sözlüğü)
сал. Ч  саларский
сальб. Ч сальбинский (говор Ч по  астрену)
самоед. Ч  самоедский (самодийский) (Nenets)
санскр. Ч санскрит
са€н. Ч  са€нский ( обдо-ойратский - Mong.)
сельджук. Ч  сельджукский
селькуп. Ч  селькупский самоед. (Nenets)
серб. Ч  сербский
симб. Ч  симбирский (диалект) (мишарский диалект татарского €зыка)
сино-кор. Ч  сино-корейский (actually, Korean without sino)
сир. Ч  сирийский
согд. Ч  согдийский
сойон. Ч сойонский (тувинский)
сойот. Ч  сойотский (тюркский €зык, близкородственный тувинскому, тофаларскому и кЄк-мончакскому)
солон. Ч  солонский2 (эвенк)
ср.-монг. Ч  среднемонгольский
ср.-перс. Ч  среднеперсидский2
ср.-тюрк. Ч  среднетюркский (тюркский €зык Ђƒиванаї ћахмуда  ашгарского)
ср.-чул. Ч  среднечулымский
ст.-слав. Ч  старослав€нский
ст.-уз. Ч  стороузбекский
сюг. Ч  сарыг-югурский

т. Ч  тракайский (диалект караимского €зыка)
тавги-самоед. Ч  тавги-самоедский (нганасанский)2
тар. Ч  таранчинский (кульджинский Ч говор центрального диалекта уйгурского €зыка)
тат. Ч  татарский
тел. Ч  телеутский (диалект алтайского €зыка)
теленг. Ч  теленгитский
тоб. Ч  тобольский (говор тобольских татар)

тодж. Ч  тоджинский (диалект тувинского €зыка)
тоф., тофалар. Ч тофаларский
тохар. Ч  тохарский2 (“охарские €зыки (ārsí-kučaññe или арси-кучанские €зыки, санскр. Tushāra) Ч группа индоевропейских €зыков, состо€ща€ из мЄртвых Ђтохарского јї (Ђвосточно-тохарскийї Ч ārsí") и Ђтохарского Ѕї (Ђзападно-тохарскийї Ч kučaññe).
тув. Ч тувинский
тунг. Ч тунгусо-маньчжурский
тур. Ч  турецкий
тур. ист. Ч  исторические формы слов в турецком €зыке (“аrama Sözlüğü)
турк. Ч туркменский
турфан. Ч турфанский (говор центрального диалекта уйгурского €зыка)
тюм. Ч тюменско-татарский 
тюрк. Ч тюркский, тюркские

уд. Ч удэйский (“унгус)
удин. Ч удинский (лезгинска€ группа)
удм. Ч удмуртский
уз. Ч узбекский
уйг. Ч уйгурский

финно-угор. - финно-угорский, финноугорские)
фин. Ч финский

хаз. Ч хазара
хак. Ч хакасский
хал. Ч халаджские говоры
халх. Ч халхаский2 (ћонг.)
хетт. Ч хеттский
хор. Ч хорезмский (напр., хорезмские говоры узбекского €зыка)
хорас. Ч  хорасанско-тюркский
хотан. Ч  хотанский (диалект уйгурского €зыка)
 ÷
церк.-слав. Ч  церковнослав€нский (диалект)2

чаг Ч  чагатайский (чагатайский тюрки, староузбекский, караханидский)
черем. Ч  черемисский (марийский)
чж. Ч чжурчженьский (тунгусо-маньчжурский)
чув. Ч  чувашский
чул. Ч  €зык чулымских тюрков
Ў
шор. Ч  шорский
Ё
эвен. Ч  эвенский (тунгусо-маньчжурский)
 две€к. Ч  эвенкский, эвенкийский (тунгусо-маньчжурский, тунгус)
 эушт. Ч  эуштинский (€ушта, €зык томских тюрков)
ё
южно. тюрк. Ч  южнотюркское
юрак.-саам. Ч  юрако-самоедский (ненецкий)
 я

€гноб. Ч  €гнобский
€к.Ч €кутский (—аха, Sakha)
€п. Ч  €понский
9

Home
Contents Türkic languages

Datelines
Sources
Roots
Tamgas
Alphabet
Writing
Language
Genetics
Geography
Archeology
Religion
Coins

Datelines
Classification of Türkic languages
Language Types
Lingo-Ethnical Tree
IE, Arians, Dravidian, and Rigveda
Scythian Ethnic Affiliation
Ogur and Oguz
Türkic and European in Neo- & Mesolith
Türkic in Romance
Türkic in Greek
Türkic-Etruscan
V.I.Abaev: girdle of Scytho-Iranian theory
Alan Dateline
Avar Dateline
Besenyo Dateline
Bulgar Dateline
Huns Dateline
Karluk Dateline
Khazar Dateline
Kimak Dateline
Kipchak Dateline
Kyrgyz Dateline
Sabir Dateline
Seyanto Dateline
11/13/2018
–ейтинг@Mail.ru УФθδğŋɣšāáäēəðč ï öōüūûУФ Türkic Türkic –